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Impact Studies





INTA’s policy, resources and communications activities for our members depends on having accurate data. INTA’s Impact Studies Committee (ISC) commissions and coordinates research projects and studies on behalf of the Association. This section sets out the various studies that INTA has commissioned and published.

Completed studies are available at no cost. Simply provide your contact information to download a study. To learn more about INTA’s Impact Studies, contact Sheila Francis at sfrancis@inta.org.
The Economic Impacts of Counterfeiting and Piracy

INTA and ICC-BASCAP commissioned this study. The report builds on the findings of a 2016 report by the OECD and EUIPO that looked at the scope of counterfeiting and piracy in international trade. The OECD/EUIPO report found that international trade in counterfeit and pirated products is increasing, and reached an estimated value of US $461 billion in 2013, accounting for 2.5% of all international trade. The INTA-BASCAP report confirms that this illicit trade will continue to increase and forecasts that will reach an estimated US $991 billion by 2022.

The broad scope of the study includes an examination of the economic value of domestic counterfeiting, and digital piracy in films, music and software. In addition, the report estimates the negative impacts of counterfeiting and piracy on displaced economic activity, investment, public fiscal losses, criminal enforcement, economic growth and employment.

Click here to download an infographic containing some key figures from the study.

Fill out your information below to receive a copy of the study.

Las marcas en América Latina: Estudio del impacto económico en cinco países de la region (Chile, Colombia, México, Panamá y Perú)

Trademarks in Latin America: A study of their economic impact in five countries in the region (Chile, Colombia, Mexico, Panama, and Peru)

INTA and ASIPI collaborated on this study to determine the impact of trademark-intensive industries on the economies of Chile, Colombia, Mexico, Panama and Peru. The study focuses on trademarks’ contribution to gross domestic product (GDP); external trade; tax revenue; foreign direct investment and job creation, and on their benefit to employment and wages. Across the five countries, trademark-intensive industries generated 8% - 26% of total employment; and 10% - 21% of GDP. This is equivalent to 18.5 million jobs and a value added per person of US $2,390 annually. 

Currently, the Spanish version of the study is available. The English version will be published in early 2017.

Fill out your information below to receive a copy of the study.